Prisoners-of-War

List of 92nd Illinois soldiers who were prisoners-of-war. Details of each soldier’s imprisonment are given, when possible. List is arranged alphabetically.

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Allen, Pvt. Hiram, Co. F; details unknown

Apple, Pvt. Balsar, Co. I; details unknown

Baker, Pvt. Perril G., Co. F; prisoner of war; captured 6/22/64 at Kingston, GA; died 12/6/64 of chronic diarrhea at Charleston, SC.; buried Beaufort National Cemetery, Beaufort, SC.; marked as P.R. Baker

Bashaw, Pvt. Henry, Co. I; details unkonwn

Baysinger, Pvt. Alexander, Co. G; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; died, Andersonville; grave unknown

Best, Pvt. Coston, Co. E; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; died, Florence, South Carolina; grave unknown

Bly, Pvt. William M., Co. K; details unknown

Cattanach (aka. Cattarach, Castana), Pvt. William, Co. B; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; then shot through ribs, shot again through lungs by Confederate Lt. Pointer, murdered at point of capture; died one day later in 92nd camp

Chapins, Pvt. George, Co. C; details unknown

Chase, Pvt. Francis M., Co. C; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; survived Andersonville

Clark, Pvt. Sample J., Co. F; details unknown

Cook, David Grant; (also spelled Cooke); Co. C.; after transfer from 92nd to USCT, captured by Forrest’s command 12/20/64 at Murfreesboro, TN.; shot, killed with two others, 12/22/64.

Davis, Pvt. Nathaniel, Co. K, survived Andersonville

Elliott, Pvt. Edwin W., Co. B; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; died, Andersonville; diarrhea, starvation; 9/7/64; grave #8084

Elliott, Sgt. William A., Co. E; details unknown

Forbes, Pvt. James M., Co. I; details unknown

Frank, Pvt. George M., Co. C; survived Florence

Fraser , Pvt. Don R., Co. I; captured near Atlanta, 10/19/64; survived Castle Morgan, survived three stints in Andersonville; escaped twice while being transported; recaptured twice; wrote memoirs

Gay, Pvt. Floyd, Co. H; details unknown

Guyer, Pvt. William, Co. E; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; died, Andersonville; dysentery; 8/8/64; grave #5025

Harrington, Pvt. E. D., Co. K; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; Andersonville; died, Florence, South Carolina; 10/4/64; grave unknown

Heistand, Sgt. Benjamin F., Co. D; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; died, Andersonville; dysentery;   8/2/64; grave #4583

Helm, Surgeon Clinton; in charge of field hospital, Chickamauga Battlefield, 9/63; allowed self to be captured while tending injured troops on field; was permitted by Confederates to remain on field and care for men for two weeks; imprisoned, Libby, 10/10/63; released 11/24/63; allowed to rejoin regiment

Hill, Pvt. Jonothan A., Co. K; details unknown

Hills, Pvt.  Willie, Co. K; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; then shot in chest and killed on field

Houser, Pvt. Abraham, Co. G; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; survived Andersonville

Houser, Pvt. Christopher, Co. G; details unknown

Irvine, Pvt. William, Co. H; details unknown

Kelley, Pvt. Patrick, Co. K; prisoner 1/63 - 8/63; prison unknown; survived and paroled; returned to regiment for remainder of war

Kenney, Pvt. Elisha, Co. K; details unknown

Kooker, Pvt. Mahler D., Co. H; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; survived Andersonville

Lawrence, Leander, Pvt., Co. C; injured in line of duty while riding horse along trail in darkness on rain-soaked night; horse slipped and fell into ditch, landing on top of him; prisoner-of-war, 2/20/65 until near war’s end

Lewis, Pvt. Baton H., Co. K; died while POW, 1865

Mader, Pvt. John, Co. F; details unknown

McMillen, Pvt. Henry H., Co. D; details unknown

McWorthy, Pvt. William P., Co. I; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; died, Andersonville; diarrhea; 9/25/64; grave #9710

Merritt, Pvt. James M., Co. K; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; survived Andersonville

Miller , Pvt. Henry, Co. F; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; died, Andersonville;  pneumonia; 7/10/64; grave  #3139

Miller, Pvt. Morris R., Co. A; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; died, Andersonville; scorbutus; 9/26/64; grave #9795

Noe, Pvt. Benjamin, Co. H; captured, 4/23/64,Nickojack, Georgia; survived Andersonville and Florence, S.C. prisons

Norton, Pvt. Julius C, Co. B., died, Florence, Alabama; 11/19/64

O’Connor, Pvt. Joural, Co. B; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; then shot and killed by Rebel Lt. Pointer for being unable to keep up on foot with captors on horseback

O’Rorke, Pvt. James, Co. H; died on Steamer Lyon

Oakley, Pvt. Thomas D., Co. C; details unknown

Reeves, Pvt. Robert, Co. H ; details unknown, POW, Andersonville Prison several months

Reeder, Pvt. John P., Co. A; details unknown

Revelle, (aka Rebelle), Pvt. Wallace, Co. K; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; survived Andersonville

Reynolds, Pvt. Charles W., Co. I; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Geogia; survived Macon; survived Andersonville; survived Pemberton; his very detailed sketch of Andersonville prison pen on display at Iowa State Historical Museum, Des Moines, Iowa; brother, William, also captured, then killed, 4/23/64, Nickojack; wrote memoirs

Reynolds, Pvt. William H., Co. I; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack; then shot, murdered at point of capture for his boots; brother, Charles, also captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, and sent to Andersonville

Rogers, Pvt. Edward, Co. F; details unknown

Scoville, Cap. Horace C, Co. K; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia 4/23/64; survived Andersonville, survived Macon

Sheets, Pvt. William H., Co. K; details unknown

Shoemaker, Pvt. David, Co. D; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; survived Andersonville

Slosser, Cpl. Henry, Co. E; died, Andersonville; scorbutus; 6/28/64

Smith, Pvt. John, Co. E; details unknown

Smith, Pvt. Thomas A., Co. G; details unknown

Snyder, Pvt. William, Co. D; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; died, Andersonville; grave unknown

Spence, Sgt. John, Co. F;  survived Andersonville

Stohl, Pvt. Jeremiah G., Co. E; details unknown

Stolhut, Pvt. Augustus, Co. K; died, Andersonville; wounds; 11/23/64

Tyler, Pvt. Nathan C., Co. A; captured, 4/23/64, Nickojack, Georgia; survived eleven months at Andersonville; wrote memoirs

Ventioner, Pvt. George W., Co. F; details unknown

Woodruff, Pvt. Constantine V., Co. D; details unknown

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Individual company distribution of prisoners-of-war as follows:

Company A:     3

Company B:     4

Company C:     5

Company D:     5

Company E:     6

Company F:     8

Company G:     4

Company H:     6

Company I:      6

Company J:     (this company did not exist)

Company K:   13

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Two  eye-witness accounts of Andersonville Prison as told by members of the 92nd Illinois:

Charles W. Reynolds was one of the unfortunate soldiers on picket at Nickojack Gap, Georgia, when he was captured by General Wheeler’s forces and sent to Andersonville Prison. He shared his experience at that prison: 

“As we entered, a sight of horror met our eyes that almost froze our blood and made our hearts stop beating. Before us were skeleton forms that once had been stalwart men – covered with rags and filth and vermin – with hollow cheeks and glaring eyes. We laid down in the sand without a thing under or over us, and already nearly stripped of clothing by our captors. For many days we remained so exposed to the cold dew at night and the scorching sun by day. I have counted one hundred and thirty lifeless skeletons of our boys that had died in one day. You might walk around the prison any hour in the day and see men closing their eyes in death. Diarrhea and scurvy appeared to be the most fatal diseases. I cannot describe the hopeless misery and suffering. Imagination cannot conceive of it.”

Nathan C. Tyler was also captured at Nickojack and sent to Andersonville. Here is his account:

“The first thing that met my eyes was the rebels carrying out the dead from the prison. They were carried on stretchers to the gate of the stockade and then thrown into wagons, entirely nude, from twenty to thirty in a wagon and hauled away and thrown into trenches. When we reached the inside of the prison we found the most wretched-looking human beings that it is possible for the imagination to conceive of - mere skeletons, filthy, and eaten up with vermin. Our rations consisted of a half pint of corn meal to each man, ground with the cob.”

 

 

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